Posts Tagged ‘source’

open sourcing – mepath

June 21, 2010

The code that is used to operate mepath.com was open sourced last week.  It is called the lifestylelinking – open source project.

data decentralization

May 12, 2010

The gravity of Facebook has started to pull on all data on the web.  The opportunity of giving individuals the power to expand their social network to all places on the web is a good thing.  The question is: should one business be the monopoly provider of this utility?  Some young developers think their is a need for an alternative, a decentralized alternative, they have crowd sourced funding and are called Diaspora Project.

The team at RedWriteWeb have a great overview on them.  The most interesting thing they write about Diaspora is that they are using a wordpress like development stance, opensource on the one hand and a managed hosted service on the other, I’d call that a cloud service.  They point to no centralization but I have found that the wordpress.com service does exactly this.  They restrict the plugins and other functionality for security reasons.  I’d like to see us making this hosted or cloud service have the same standalone freedom as a self installed server has.  What technical implications that involves are not fully known but if the goal is to have data portability and interoperability of data at the individuals control then, we should aim for those same standards on the applications that enable that empowerment.

context competition

April 26, 2010

Not everyone ‘likes’ the implication foreseen for the Facebook Like button.  Adina Levin’s writes concisely about social context, its benefits, the activitystream standard and competitive forces in the market of context services.   The current paradigm for FB news feeds is to author once and send to all (from F8 a FB solution to this is to introduce Dashboards from different application or likes).  Whereas Adina holds up an activitystream vision for users context to be given the “‘capability to create more refined – and contexually relevant – posting choices and reading filters”.  She makes the case that the ‘like’ button holds to a different social context vision one where “Facebook is your one and only source of context”.

The opensourcers at FB point to their adoption of RDFa and the flexibility this provides, especially when connected to the FB API, including freer access to all openGrapth data types.  Adina makes a call for FB to adopt the Activitystreams standard and to complete on a level playing field with others wishing to specialize in offering such services.  How can you compete?, offer websites an activitystream based services where the users get a better context experience and then let those users spread the word.